For the highest-quality livestream product, you'll want an audio setup that includes crisp music and voice together.

Luckily, Zoom allows you to share audio from sources like Spotify, Pandora, Apple Music, or Youtube while allowing the instructor’s voice to layer over the music.* There are many ways to configure your audio and video setup for great performance–here are two.

Make sure to test and soundcheck your setup before your first public class. Every piece of gear and software application operates slightly differently, and some Bluetooth headsets (older and less-expensive ones mostly) are unable to provide the in-ear monitoring capabilities you'll need. Apple Airpods are a great example of Bluetooth earbuds that DO work with these instructions.

IMPORTANT: the info in this article applies to the laptop/desktop version of the Zoom app. If you plan to use music, we strongly advise you to use a laptop/desktop to stream. The smartphone and tablet versions of the Zoom app do not have these advanced features.

Stream from home using Bluetooth

What you’ll need:

  • A Bluetooth-enabled laptop with a webcam
  • Look for the following specs:
  • Dual- or quad-core
  • Clock speed of 1.7 GHz or greater
  • 8 GB of RAM
  • Bluetooth earbuds with a built-in microphone
  • An internet connection with download/upload speeds above 5Mbps

How to get started:

1. Connect your wireless headset or earbuds to your computer via Bluetooth.

2. Click Stream Class in the email you received from FitGrid to launch Zoom.

3. Select Join With Computer Audio when prompted.

4. Select Share at the bottom of Zoom.

5. In the pop-up window, select the following: Advanced > Computer Sound Only > Share Computer Sound > Share.

6. Visit your go-to music streaming app, such as Spotify, Pandora or Youtube and begin to play your music.*

7. Return to the main Zoom window, click the chevron (arrow) next to the Mute button, and select “Audio Settings.”

8. Ensure that you’ve selected the proper input and output devices. Then un-check "Automatically adjust microphone volume" and adjust your microphone input volume slider until you can be heard by your audience over the music very well.

9. Music still too loud for your audience relative to your voice? Return to your music app and adjust the volume slider there.

10. Once your levels are balanced and everything sounds crisp to your audience, switch back to Zoom and start your class!

Stream from the studio

What you’ll need:

  • A mixer with input for music and input for a wireless mic
  • Boxes and/or cables to convert mixer output (XLR, RCA, or ¼”) into ⅛” output, then attach an SC4 adapter (view this video to learn what any of this means)
  • A laptop with a webcam and an aux input
  • Look for the following specs:
  • Dual- or quad-core
  • Clock speed of 1.7 GHz or greater
  • 8 GB of RAM
  • An internet connection with download/upload speeds above 5Mbps

How to get started:

  1. Connect your music player and wireless headset to the mixer.
  2. Convert your mixer output (XLR, RCA, or ¼”) to ⅛” output, then attach an SC4 adapter.
  3. Connect the aux output of the SC4 adapter to the audio input on your laptop.
  4. On your laptop, click Stream Class in the email you received from FitGrid to launch Zoom.
  5. Select Share at the bottom of Zoom.
  6. In the pop-up window, select the following: Advanced > Computer Sound Only > Share Computer Sound > Share.
  7. Visit your music streaming app on the device connected to the mixer such as Spotify, Pandora or Youtube and select your music.*
  8. Return to the main Zoom window, click the chevron (arrow) next to the Mute button, and select “Audio Settings.”
  9. Ensure that you’ve selected the proper input and output devices. Then un-check "Automatically adjust microphone volume" and adjust your microphone input volume slider until you can be heard by your audience over the music very well.
  10. Music still too loud for your audience relative to your voice? Return to your music app and adjust the volume slider there.
  11. Switch back to Zoom and start your class.

*Note: Just like in a studio environment, you are legally responsible for obtaining rights and permissions to stream music during a virtual class. 

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